Confessions of the Professions

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The Teaching Job [Interview]

Posted by Confessions of the Professions in Confessions

Matthew Gates

http://www.matthewgates.co/

 

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People in this field are very underrated in terms of what they actually do for us. They know us as children, as young adults, and even as adults. They are constantly instilling and drilling into us specific values and knowledge about the world. Many of them are overworked and underpaid, but expected to do their jobs. We know them as teachers.

The teaching profession is a rewarding experience, as the teacher is the learner, and provides valuable knowledge to those who are learning. Teachers, unfortunately, often must abide by a specific curriculum, usually approved by the school or state. Some teachers will experiment with their students, while other stick to the general teaching-learning structure.

It may seem like some students have a hard time learning, but it may just be in how the teacher is teaching the lesson. It takes a special teacher to be patient and understanding with all their students, especially developing lesson plans that cater to all students.

Teaching is about passion and creativity. If you want to get into teaching for the money, you might be better off getting into a different field. If you find teaching rewarding because you get to teach something and inspire students, than teaching may just be for you!

This is my interview with Philip Turner, a chemistry teacher, who has some advice for those looking to get into the teaching field.

What is your name?

Philip Turner.

What were your interests growing up as a child or teenager?

Reading, Music.

What were your interests in college or as a young adult?

Girls.

What do you do for work?

For most of my life I was a teacher in high school.

How did you get your current job?

Teaching job – I applied through an ad in the newspaper.

What was a defining moment in your career?

Seeing the joy on a child's face as everything about the subject (chemistry) clicked into place in one 30 second sequence.

Why did you choose this career path?

I had a silly idea about the purity of knowledge and wanted to pass on my knowledge of Chemistry.

What is one thing you would change about your company?

I would appoint stronger leaders who would do what needs to be done.

What is one thing you would change about your life?

Get out of teaching 10 years earlier.

If you could leave a legacy or be known as doing something great for your company, what would it be?

Develop a better way of teaching.

Do you have any advice for someone looking to get into your career field?

Don't – teaching burns you out before you are 40. If you do go in then work on an alternative use of your teaching skills and aim to get out in your 30s.

 

Never let anything stand in your way of your dreams or your careers! If it is your desire to become a teacher, than be a teacher! If you want to be something else, than be something else! Figure out what you want to do, do what you love, and get paid to do it! If you become a teacher, just remember that you are not only the teacher, but the student as well!



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