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Can You Taste A Culinary Arts Career? [Infographic]

Author: Kendall College Culinary School
Website: http://www.kendall.edu/
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Culinary Arts Career Guide: An Infographic by the Team at Kendall College’s Culinary School

Ever think about pursuing a career in the culinary arts field? Many people dream about becoming a top chef at a 5 star restaurant, however there are also 13 million jobs provided by the restaurant industry, a number that is on the rise by 2.8% in 2014. There is a wide variety of career options available outside of the restaurant kitchen with a degree in culinary arts.

Some people know from the beginning they are destined for a career in culinary arts. They were born with a taste for fine ingredients, eschewing microwavable corn dogs and cartoon-shaped macaroni for deviled eggs and mini quiches as children. They frittered away play times engrossed in their Easy Bake ovens and plastic kitchens, and spent their evenings following grandma around the kitchen.

These individuals feel more comfortable with a whisk in their hand than they do with a pen or Blackberry. They can’t name all the U.S. presidents off the top of their head, but they can list all the ingredients or duck à l'orange without hesitating. And naturally, they would turn down admission to Harvard Law in a heartbeat for a chance to go to Kendall College or Le Cordon Bleu.

For many others, however, their culinary career destiny isn't always quite so apparent. Maybe they were picky eaters as kids, and never developed a taste for porcini mushrooms or dry vermouth. Or maybe they appreciate good food, but can’t bake a cupcake without setting the kitchen on fire. (It happens even to the best of us sometimes.)

These are people who could never imagine themselves as master chefs making world-renowned cuisine. Instead, they are interested in things like running businesses, coordinating events, and developing new technologies – not exactly things that are associated with the culinary arts. But they should be, because there are all kinds of different careers available in the industry, and for many of them understanding an Excel spreadsheet is a better baseline than knowing how to poach an egg.


Can You Taste A Culinary Arts Career? [Infographic]

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CAN YOU TASTE A CULINARY ARTS CAREER?

STUDY DOESN'T ALWAYS NEEDS TO LEAD TO THE STOVE

The restaurant industry provides jobs for 13 MILLION PEOPLE[1], including 115,400 CHEFS[2] and head cooks, and 807,800[2] food preparation workers.

Restaurant industry jobs will INCREASE by 2.8%[2] in 2014, outpacing the 1.8%[2] GAIN in total U.S. employment.

THERE ARE MANY CULINARY CAREER OPTIONS BOTH IN AND OUTSIDE RESTAURANT SETTINGS
FEAST YOUR EYES ON FOOD AND BEVERAGE EDUCATION DEGREES

COOKING DEGREEWHOPRE-GRAD QUALIFICATIONGENERAL DURATION*INTERNSHIP REQUIRED
Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in Culinary ArtsStudents interested in careers at the highest levels of the culinary industry, both inside and outside restaurants.Completion of general education courseworkFour YearsYes
Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) in Culinary ArtsStudents interested specifically in the kitchen environment.Completion of general education courseworkTwo Years (full-time), Four Years (part-time)Yes
Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) in Baking and PastryStudents who want a very focused program specializing in baking; it may lead to careers in restaurants, bakeries, or elsewhere.Strong interest in the specialty of bakingTwo yearsYes
OTHER DEGREES AND LEARNING OPTIONSWHOPRE-GRAD QUALIFICATIONGENERAL DURATION*INTERNSHIP REQUIRED
Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in Hospitality Management; Beverage ManagementStudents wanting to work in the rapidly growing world of specialty mixology, wine, beer and liquor.Completion of general education courseworkFour yearsYes
Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in Hospitality Management; Restaurant/Food and Beverage ManagementStudents who want to own and/or operate establishments in the food industry and beverage industry.Completion of general education courseworkFor yearsYes
Culinary Certificate ExperienceStudents who want to gain a greater understanding of food and have a higher level of home cooking skills.Strong interest in cooking and baking10 weeks to one yearNo

* Time to completion ma vary depending on student's course load and successful completion of the courses.

A FULL MENU OF FOOD AND BEVERAGE CAREERS

RESTAURANT CAREERS AND EXAMPLES
Average Salary
EXECUTIVE CHEFA restaurant's executive chef is generally in charge of planning menus, kitchen sanitation, food quality control, production scheduling, purcashing supplies, food presentation, training kitchen staff, and assigning duties. Typically they have significant experience and a formal education$69,494B.A. Culinary ArtsA.A.S. Culinary Arts
PASTRY CHEFChefs specializing in making pastries or other baked goods, with some going on to own their own businesses.$33,000B.A. Culinary ArtsA.A.S. Culinary ArtsA.A.S. Baking and Pastry
SOUS CHEFThe sous chef performs many of the same duties as the executive chef and requires similar training.$44,627B.A. Culinary ArtsA.A.S. Culinary Arts

 

NON-RESTAURANT COOKING CAREERS AND EXAMPLES
Average Salary
PRIVATE CHEFA private chef serves one or more clients, preparing all of their meals. These chefs may provide meal planning and meal services.$200-$500 per dayB.A. Culinary ArtsA.A.S. Culinary Arts
PROFESSIONAL CATERINGA person or company who plans, delivers, and prepares food for events or occasions. A caterer may be self-employed, work for a restaurant or hospitality company, or even operate out of a mobile delivery vehicle.$32,000-$75,000 depending on location and size of companyB.A. Culinary ArtsA.A.S. Culinary Arts

 

Jodi Fyfe, B.A. in Hospitality Management from Kendall College, '91

Current role: Principal of Paramount Events

My education in Hospitality Management provided the foundation for my career and taught me how to balance the art of hospitality with the science of business management.

 

NON-RESTAURANT CAREERS AND EXAMPLES
Average Salary
FOOD TECHNOLOGYA person who may work directly with food in the development of recipes or ingredients, improve food products, and set standards for food production and packaging.$60,000B.A. Culinary Arts
PUBLIC RELATIONS / MARKETINGTypes of careers include: account executive, advertising manager, ad sales director, communications specialist, event coordinator, market analyst, market researcher, media buyer, media coordinator, product development manager public relations director, or sales manager.$40,000B.A. Culinary ArtsB.A. Hospitality Management
RESTAURANT AND FOOD CONSULTING EDUCATIONA person who provides advice to restaurateurs as tehy open a new restaurant or attempt to revive a failing one.$52,000B.A. Culinary ArtsA.A.S. Culinary ArtsB.A. Hospitality Management
EDUCATIONHigh school, college, or culinary instructor.$53,000 varies depending on levelB.A. Culinary Arts
WRITERS AND EDITORSIncludes: cookbook writer/editor, food critic/reviewer, food photographer, food stylist, or recipe writer/editor.$47,000A.A.S. Culinary ArtsB.A. Hospitality Management

 

Damien Eftekhar, A.A.S. Culinary Arts from Kendall College, '01

Current role: Culinary Associate Manager, Consumer Relationship Marketing at Kraft Foods

The beauty of my culinary education is that even if you don't end up being a chef, what chef instructors teach will prepare you for anything. The chef mentality applies to any field, including the key values of open-mindedness, humility, and discipline. Focusing on these allowed me to learn from the best and succeed in some very competitive areas in the culinary world.

 

Maggie Hennessy, Certifiate of Professional Cookery from Kendall College, '10

Current role: Senior Correspondent, FoodNavigator-USA, budget columnist, Chicago Magazine

I didn't pursue a certificate of professional cookery for traditional reasons, but my chef instructors were extremely supportive of my goal to become a full-time food writer, facilitating additional learning opportunities that fit my aspirations.

READY FOR THE WORLD
kendall.edu

Kendall College
CHICAGO • UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

[1] restaurant.org
[2] allculinaryschools.com/culinary-careers/guide/culinary-arts/culinary-career-outlook


About the Author

Matthew Zajechowski is an outreach manager for Digital Third Coast.  Connect with him on Twitter and Google+.



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1 Comment

  1. Can You Taste A Culinary Arts Career? [Infographic] http://t.co/nFa4cHs97V via @OneTruConscious

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  • Some people were born with a taste for fine ingredients, eschewing microwavable corn dogs and cartoon-shaped macaroni for devilled eggs and mini quiches as children.
  • They can’t name all the U.S. presidents off the top of their head, but they can list all the ingredients or duck à l'orange without hesitating.
  • And naturally, they would turn down admission to Harvard Law in a heartbeat for a chance to go to Kendall College or Le Cordon Bleu.